Ongoing cyber hacking vs 1 question on 1 piece of paper distributed every 10 years

The number of people running about the front yard with hair on fire over the proposal to insert the question about citizenship into USA’s 2020 Census questionnaire is high. Yes, the once-every-10-year-census data serves as the foundation for many decisions bad or good but, luckily, we have the right to turnover users of this data every 2, 4 and 6 years.

I believe in citizenship. I believe in legal immigration, clear immigration laws and ruthless enforcement of and even state adherence to this nation’s immigration laws.

As per previous articles, I whole-heartedly support DACA recipients.

I also believe in the right to vote in USA to be the right of US citizens only.

What are the potential downsides to adding to Census questionnaire this question not required or barred by our constitution? Gerrymandering congressional districts. Unnamed lasting impact on society. Undercounting the US population. Inaccurate data would influence each State’s number of house seats, and electoral votes. Reduction of communities’ share of federal funds for highways, healthcare, education and other vital services.

Gerrymandering congressional districts is at its heart a political and ideological concern. Gerrymandering takes place everywhere across this country and has for a very, very long time with a view to benefitting whichever political party enjoys a majority. Stop. Stop gerrymandering by carving districts approximating an Escher drawing and for the sole purpose of retaining or gaining turf with little concern for those politicians are meant to represent. If gerrymandering is to occur, let gerrymandering be implemented based on representing US citizens who have the right to vote. If you’re not a US citizen, apply for citizenship or, start or join a political action group.

Unnamed lasting impact on society is vague but I’ll tag the statement ideological, political and societal. The honorable US Senator from California, Kamala Harris, publicizes this fear. Whichever party, ideology is not in the majority will fear laws passed by the majority will impact society. If you don’t like the laws, party and, or ideology, vote the rascals out.

Undercounting the US population is a political and societal concern and presumably surfaced out of fear that citizenship question will motivate non-citizens to not respond to census. If all US politicians would remind all living in this country – especially non-citizens residing in their patch – of Title 13 and it’s unambiguous promise of anonymity, is there not a chance that our population would not be undercounted? I sincerely want to know how many people – citizens and non-citizens – are living in this country.

Thanks to Title 13 – Census, non-citizens need not fear their individual information or status being shared with anyone – not the IRS, not the FBI, not the CIA, and not with any other government agency. If all including media broadcasting in all languages put their back into conveying this important information to their various viewers, we might significantly reduce this understandable anxiety and for once and in my view media would be doing a public service by broadcasting legal facts.

Title_13_Summary

Inaccurate data would influence each State’s number of house seats, and electoral votes are also a political and ideological concern. Awarding a state, county, city, unincorporated town or other more influence, electoral votes based on a significant number of non-citizens residing in that geography undermines a similar geography elsewhere in the country and with same size population but comprised of predominately US citizens. Degrading US citizens’ proportional representation in deference to non-citizens is a proposition I cannot support.

Reduction of communities’ share of federal funds for highways, healthcare, education and other vital services is in my view a political and societal concern. I would like to counter this concern with a quid pro quo suggestion. If the number of households and citizens residing in a community corresponds to the number of households, citizens who file tax returns irrespective of whether they did or did not pay taxes, I would insist as a US citizen that such communities receive their share of federal funds.

And then there is the Neanderthal view of what the once-every-10-years information the census might provide versus modern-day means of collecting and then collating very specific and targeted demographic and geographic information. If our political parties and their 3rd-party vendors including but not limited to cyber hackers were able to influence the 2016 presidential election, is it not possible that these same parties and cyber hackers could not more accurately identify pockets of non-citizens residing in America than they might relying on US Census information?

I know that a significant majority of Mexicans living legally or illegally in the USA rely on mobile phones to voice or video call relatives living in Mexico. I also know that there exists data, heat maps that identify to the zip code level the location from where these calls are initiated. I do not mean to pick on Mexicans, as these call-home patterns are true for all immigrant communities within the USA.

Why would any technologically aware person with nefarious intent wait on a 10-year census cycle when they could access much more robust, accurate electronic data on an hourly, daily basis?

Allow me to remind readers of the Equifax hack, leaked NSA hacking tools, WannaCry, NotPeya impacting FedEx, British advertising agency EPP, Russia’s oil and gas giant Rosneft, and Danish shipping firm Maersk. And let’s not forget Bad Rabbit, GOP exposed voter records, school district hacking, and Uber customer data breach.

It was my intent to provide what I hope are relevant rebuttals to reasons against asking after citizenship status in 2020 Census and, more important, expose at least one alternative to 2020 Census to collect and collate more accurate, targeted and timely information that would in my opinion accelerate achieving nefarious outcomes rightly or wrongly assigned to those who want to ask the citizenship question.

I believe in citizenship. I believe in legal immigration, clear immigration laws and ruthless enforcement of and even state adherence to this nation’s immigration laws.

I only wish our politicians, their handlers and media would address as a matter of urgency the resources required by our various law enforcement agencies to deal with the clear and present danger that is cyber hacking versus one question printed on a piece of paper distributed every 10 years.

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